Document Type




Format of Original

15 p.

Publication Date




Source Publication

American Journal of Ophthalmology

Source ISSN


Original Item ID

doi: 10.1016/j.ajo.2012.06.003; PubMed Central, PMCID: PMC3498541



To examine retinal structure and changes in photoreceptor intensity after dark adaptation in patients with complete congenital stationary night blindness and Oguchi disease.


Prospective, observational case series.


We recruited 3 patients with complete congenital stationary night blindness caused by mutations in GRM6, 2 brothers with Oguchi disease caused by mutations in GRK1, and 1 normal control. Retinal thickness was measured from optical coherence tomography images. Integrity of the rod and cone mosaic was assessed using adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy. We imaged 5 of the patients after a period of dark adaptation and examined layer reflectivity on optical coherence tomography in a patient with Oguchi disease under light- and dark-adapted conditions.


Retinal thickness was reduced in the parafoveal region in patients with GRM6 mutations as a result of decreased thickness of the inner retinal layers. All patients had normal photoreceptor density at all locations analyzed. On removal from dark adaptation, the intensity of the rods (but not cones) in the patients with Oguchi disease gradually and significantly increased. In 1 Oguchi disease patient, the outer segment layer contrast on optical coherence tomography was 4-fold higher under dark-adapted versus light-adapted conditions.


The selective thinning of the inner retinal layers in patients with GRM6 mutations suggests either reduced bipolar or ganglion cell numbers or altered synaptic structure in the inner retina. Our finding that rods, but not cones, change intensity after dark adaptation suggests that fundus changes in Oguchi disease are the result of changes within the rods as opposed to changes at a different retinal locus.


NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in American Journal of Ophthalmology. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in American Journal of Ophthalmology, Vol. 154, No. 6 (December 2012): 987–1001. DOI. © Elsevier 2012. Used with permission.