Document Type

Article

Language

eng

Format of Original

15 p.

Publication Date

6-2008

Publisher

Springer

Source Publication

Journal of Business Ethics

Source ISSN

0167-4544

Original Item ID

doi: 10.1007/s10551-007-9403-7

Abstract

This study is rooted in the research traditions of cultivation theory, construct accessibility, and availability heuristic. Based on a survey with 221 subjects, this study finds that familiarity with direct-to-consumer (DTC) print advertisements for antidepressant brands is associated with inflated perceptions of the prevalence and lifetime risk of depression. The study concludes that DTC advertising potentially has significant effects on perceptions of depression prevalence and risk. Interpersonal experiences with depression coupled with DTC advertising appear to significantly predict individuals' perceived lifetime risk of depression. The study ultimately demonstrates that DTC advertising may play a role in constructing social reality of diseases and medicine. The findings strongly suggest that the social cognitive effects of DTC advertising are far-reaching, impacting pharmaceutical marketing strategy as well as presenting issues regarding public health and the business ethics of advertising drugs to consumers.

Comments

Originally published in Journal of Business Ethics, Vol. 79, No. 4 (June 2008), DOI. © Springer 2008. Used with permission.

The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com

Included in

Communication Commons

Share

COinS