Predictive factors of school satisfaction in students with learning disabilities

Rae E McClain, Marquette University

Abstract

This investigation analyzed the relationships of predictor variables with school satisfaction in middle school students with learning disabilities. The literature showed that students with learning disabilities have more negative outcomes than do non-disabled peers in the areas of school completion, depression, and juvenile delinquency. Learning disabled adults were also reported to fare worse than non-disabled adults, in terms of continuing education, employment, and social adjustment. School satisfaction was used as an indicator of positive, subjective well-being in students. Possible correlates of school satisfaction in students with learning disabilities, as identified in the literature, were locus of control, self-concept, and social support. Subjects were middle school aged students receiving special education programming in an urban school district. Multiple regression analysis revealed that, of the three predictor variables, social support was predictive of school satisfaction in middle school students with learning disabilities. Further analysis, using the subcategories of social support (mother, father, male peers, female peers, and teacher) showed that the social support of teachers was predictive of school satisfaction in this study sample.

Recommended Citation

Rae E McClain, "Predictive factors of school satisfaction in students with learning disabilities" (January 1, 2000). Dissertations (1962 - 2010) Access via Proquest Digital Dissertations. Paper AAI9991614.
http://epublications.marquette.edu/dissertations/AAI9991614

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