Document Type

Article

Language

eng

Format of Original

30 p.

Publication Date

4-2003

Publisher

American Psychological Association

Source Publication

Journal of Counseling Psychology

Source ISSN

0022-0167

Abstract

Sixteen 3rd-year counseling psychology doctoral students were interviewed about their relationships with their graduate advisors. Of those students, 10 were satisfied and 6 were unsatisfied with their advising relationships. Satisfied and unsatisfied students differed on several aspects of the advising relationship, including (a) the ability to choose their advisors, (b) the frequency of meetings with their advisors, (c) the benefits and costs associated with their advising relationships, and (d) how conflict was dealt with in the advising relationship. Furthermore, all of the satisfied students reported that their advising relationships became more positive over time, whereas many of the unsatisfied students reported that their advising relationships got worse (e.g., became more distant) over time.

Comments

Accepted version. Journal of Counseling Psychology, Vol. 50, No. 2 (April 2003): 178-188. DOI. This article may not exactly replicate the final version published in the APA journal. It is not the copy of record.

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