Document Type

Article

Language

eng

Format of Original

5 p.

Publication Date

2006

Publisher

Walter de Gruyter

Source Publication

Microform & Imaging Review

Source ISSN

0949-5770

Original Item ID

doi: 10.1515/MFIR.2006.93; Shelves: Z 265 .M565 Memorial Lower Level 4

Abstract

Collection development archivists know that building a partnership with a potential donor may take years, occasionally decades. From the perspective of a donor, contributing unique materials to an archival repository – a local historical society, academic archives, or a research library – can be an emotionally complicated process. A donor must have acquired a degree of separation from the material, but also have a deep sense of trust in the repository soliciting the records. Often, the initial contribution to a repository consists of records void of sentimental or financial value. As the relationship between a donor and a repository strengthens, donors (hopefully) begin contributing more noteworthy and revealing materials, including personal correspondence, diaries, and photographs. This scenario is routine not only with the acquisition of personal papers, but the records of businesses, membership organizations, and all other kinds of archival records.

Comments

Published version. Microfilm & Imaging Review, Vol. 35, No. 3 (2006): 93-97. DOI. © Walter de Gruyter 2006. Used with permission.

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