Document Type

Article

Language

eng

Publication Date

11-2014

Publisher

Elsevier

Source Publication

Australasian Marketing Journal

Source ISSN

1441-3582

Abstract

Present copyright laws do not protect Indigenous intellectual property (IIP) sufficiently. Indigenous cultural artefacts, myths, designs and songs (among other aspects) are often free to be exploited by marketers for business' gain. Use of IIP by marketers is legal as intellectual property protection is based on the lifetime of the person who has put the IP in tangible form. However, Indigenous groups often view ownership in a very different light, seeing aspects of their culture as being owned by the group in perpetuity. Misuse of their cultural heritage by marketers in products often denies the Indigenous group a monetary benefit from their use and is frequently disrespectful. This article discusses ethical insights that might shed moral weight on this issue.

Comments

Accepted version. Australasian Marketing Journal, Vol. 22, No. 4 (November 2014): 307-313. DOI. © 2014 Australian and New Zealand Marketing Academy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. Used with permission

Available for download on Wednesday, November 01, 2017

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