German Immigrants, Race, and Citizenship in the Civil War Era

Title

German Immigrants, Race, and Citizenship in the Civil War Era

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Description

This study of Civil War–era politics explores how German immigrants influenced the rise and fall of white commitment to African-American rights. Intertwining developments in Europe and North America, Alison Clark Efford describes how the presence of naturalized citizens affected the status of former slaves and identifies 1870 as a crucial turning point. That year, the Franco-Prussian War prompted German immigrants to reevaluate the liberal nationalism underpinning African-American suffrage. Throughout the period, the newcomers’ approach to race, ethnicity, gender, and political economy shaped American citizenship law.

  • Recreates the German-language debate in the United States based on a range of under-utilized sources
  • Provides a transnational history of the Civil War era, intertwining developments in North America and Europe
  • Integrates ethnic construction and naturalization into an interpretation of race and citizenship

ISBN

9781107031937

Publication Date

5-2013

Publisher

Cambridge University Press

City

Cambridge

Disciplines

History | United States History

Comments

Introduction: naturalized citizens, transnational perspectives, and the arc of reconstruction

1. The German language of American citizenship

2. The 'freedom-loving German', 1854–60

3. Black suffrage as a German cause in Missouri, 1865

4. Principal rising, 1865–9

5. Wendepunkt: the Franco-Prussian War, 1870–1

6. The Liberal Republican transition, 1870–2

7. Class, culture, and the decline of reconstruction, 1870–6

Epilogue: the Great Strike of 1877

Appendix: voting tables

Bibliography.

German Immigrants, Race, and Citizenship in the Civil War Era

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