How to Design and Teach a Hybrid Course: Achieving Student-Centered Learning through Blended Classroom, Online and Experiential Activities

Title

How to Design and Teach a Hybrid Course: Achieving Student-Centered Learning through Blended Classroom, Online and Experiential Activities

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Description

This practical handbook for designing and teaching hybrid or blended courses focuses on outcomes-based practice. It reflects the author’s experience of having taught over 70 hybrid courses, and having worked for three years in the Learning Technology Center at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, a center that is recognized as a leader in the field of hybrid course design. Jay Caulfield defines hybrid courses as ones where not only is face time replaced to varying degrees by online learning, but also by experiential learning that takes place in the community or within an organization with or without the presence of a teacher; and as a pedagogy that places the primary responsibility of learning on the learner, with the teacher’s primary role being to create opportunities and environments that foster independent and collaborative student learning. Starting with a brief review of the relevant theory – such as andragogy, inquiry-based learning, experiential learning and theories that specifically relate to distance education – she addresses the practicalities of planning a hybrid course, taking into account class characteristics such as size, demographics, subject matter, learning outcomes, and time available. She offers criteria for determining the appropriate mix of face-to-face, online, and experiential components for a course, and guidance on creating social presence online. The section on designing and teaching in the hybrid environment covers such key elements as promoting and managing discussion, using small groups, creating opportunities for student feedback, and ensuring that students’ learning expectations are met. A concluding section of interviews with students and teachers offers a rich vein of tips and ideas.

ISBN

978 1 57922 422 6

Publication Date

2011

Publisher

Stylus Publishing

City

Sterling VA

Comments

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments

Foreword

By Alan Aycock

Preface

SECTION ONE: INTRODUCTION

1. WHAT IS HYBRID?

2. THEORETICAL APPLICATIONS

3. EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING

4. PLANNING YOUR HYBRID COURSE: Critical Questions to Consider

SECTION TWO: DESIGNING AND TEACHING YOUR HYBRID COURSE

5. DISCUSSION AS A WAY OF LEARNING IN A HYBRID COURSE

6. PROVIDING AND SOLICITING STUDENT FEEDBACK

7. USING SMALL GROUPS AS A LEARNING STRATEGY

8. MEETING STUDENT EXPECTATIONS

9. ENHANCING TEACHING THROUGH THE USE OF TECHNOLOGY

SECTION THREE: INTERVIEW DATA

10. WHAT STUDENTS SAY ABOUT HYBRID

11. WHAT THE BEST HYBRID TEACHERS SAY

12. WHAT THE BEST HYBRID TEACHERS DO

CONCLUSION

13. COMING FULL CIRCLE, FUTURE RESEARCH, AND FINAL REFLECTIONS

References

Index

Reference Index