Title

Organizational Support and Contract Fulfillment as Moderators of the Relationship Between Preferred Work Status and Performance

Document Type

Article

Language

eng

Format of Original

8 p.

Publication Date

3-2010

Publisher

Springer

Source Publication

Journal of Business and Psychology

Source ISSN

0889-3268

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to examine organizational context variables as moderators of the relationship between preferred work status and job performance. The moderators were perceived organizational support (POS) and psychological contract fulfillment.

Design/Methodology/Approach

Survey data was collected from 164 participants working in a health and fitness organization. These participants ranged in age from 18 to 79 years old (M = 40, SD = 12.5) and held various positions including middle managers, clerical workers, maintenance workers, and sports trainers.

Findings

The relationship between preferred work status and extra-role performance was negative when POS was higher but not when POS was lower. Also, the relationship between preferred work status and extra-role performance was positive when contract fulfillment was lower but not when it was higher. No moderating effects were found when examining in-role performance.

Implications

Given the large and growing use of part-time workers it is important to understand differences across various subgroups of them in order to better inform human resource policies and practices. Specifically, the results highlight a key role for the management of reciprocity perceptions.

Originality/Value

The literature on part-time workers suggests there are important differences between employees who work part-time because they prefer it and those who work part-time but prefer to work full-time. Research regarding the relationship between preferred work status and performance has produced mixed results. This study helps reconcile conflicting results regarding the relationship between preferred work status and performance by examining the moderating effects of theoretically relevant variables.

Comments

Journal of Business and Psychology, Vol. 25, No. 1 (March 2010): 131-138. DOI.

Gary Adams was affiliated with University of Wisconsin Oshkosh at the time of publication.