Document Type

Article

Language

eng

Format of Original

26 p.

Publication Date

2012

Publisher

Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

Source Publication

Journal of Poverty

Source ISSN

1087-5549

Original Item ID

DOI: 10.1080/10875549.2011.639859

Abstract

Welfare and incarceration policies have converged to form a system of governance over socially marginalized groups, particularly racial minorities. In both of these policy areas, rehabilitative and social support objectives have been replaced with a more punitive and restrictive system. The authors examine the convergence in individual-level attitudes concerning welfare and criminal punishment, using national survey data. The authors' analysis indicates a statistically significant relationship between punitive attitudes toward welfare and punishment. Furthermore, accounting for the respondents' racial attitudes explains the bivariate relationship between welfare and punishment. Thus, racial attitudes seemingly link support for punitive approaches to opposition to welfare expenditures. The authors discuss the implications of this study for welfare and crime control policies by way of the conclusion.

Comments

Accepted version. Journal of Poverty, Vol. 16, No. 1 (2012): 1-26. DOI. © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. 2012. Used with permission.

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