Title

Ratio Practica and The Intellectualistic Fallacy

Document Type

Article

Language

eng

Format of Original

18 p.

Publication Date

Spring 1982

Publisher

Wiley

Source Publication

The Journal of Religious Ethics

Source ISSN

0384-9694

Abstract

The epistemology of ethics in both philosophical and theological quarters is broadly guilty of what can be called the intellectualistic fallacy. This fallacy ignores the animating affective mold of moral knowing and so wreaks reductionism on ethical epistemology and method. Specifically, the neglect of affect as a dimension of moral cognition leads to a failure to see the relationship of all moral awareness to mysticism, contemplation, faith, and religious experience. It also leads to the adoption of false paradigms for moral knowing drawn from science, mathematics, or linguistics. This essay studies ratio practica in Thomas Aquinas and the derivative theory of affective knowledge in John of St. Thomas. Then the author proceeds to develop his own theory on the place of affectivity in the overall epistemology of ethics.

Comments

The Journal of Religious Ethics, Vol. 10, No. 1 (Spring, 1982): 22-3. Permalink.