Document Type

Article

Language

eng

Format of Original

12 p.

Publication Date

1-2016

Publisher

Oxford University Press

Source Publication

The Monist

Source ISSN

0026-9662

Original Item ID

DOI: 10.1093/monist/onv025

Abstract

Kant’s treatment of war is usually discussed as part of his political philosophy or philosophy of history. In contrast, this essay locates these discussions in direct reference to major elements of his moral philosophy: autonomy, the categorical imperative, and the moral relationality of the kingdom of ends. Within this context, Kant’s account of war, particularly in writings from the 1790s, can be read as affirming war as morally unintelligible: It is the expression of a collective withdrawal from the constitutive relationality of moral community. This results in a radical disparity in the exercise of moral autonomy by the sovereign agency of the state with respect to peace, on one hand, and with respect to war, on the other.

Comments

Accepted version. The Monist, Vol. 99, No. 1 (January 2016): 1-12. DOI. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Hegeler Institute. Used with permission.

Available for download on Monday, January 01, 2018

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