Document Type

Article

Language

eng

Publication Date

11-2020

Publisher

American Dental Association

Source Publication

Journal of the American Dental Association

Source ISSN

0002-8177

Abstract

The problem of demarcated hypomineralization defects of the permanent first molars (molar-incisor hypomineralization [MIH]) has been an emerging issue for oral health professionals around the globe. Yet, the first set of US-based epidemiologic data on MIH took as long as 2 decades from the time when MIH was first described by Weerheijm and colleagues.1 In response to the June JADA article titled “Prevalence of Molar-Incisor Hypomineralization and Other Enamel Defects and Associated Sociodemographic Determinants in Indiana,” (Tagelsir Ahmed A, Soto-Rojas AE, Dean JA, Eckert GJ, Martinez-Mier EA, JADA. 2020;151[7]: 491-501), we attempt to highlight some of the challenges encountered during the course of an MIH epidemiologic school-based data collection effort. The routes and challenges we describe below are contemplations based on 2 US MIH school studies from Wisconsin and Indiana.2,3

Comments

Accepted version. The Journal of the American Dental Association, Vol. 151, No. 11 (November 2020): 810-811. DOI. © 2020 American Dental Association. Used with permission.

Available for download on Monday, November 01, 2021

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