Title

The Convex-Concave Rules of Arthrokinematics: Flawed or Perhaps Just Misinterpreted?

Document Type

Article

Language

eng

Format of Original

3 p.

Publication Date

2-2012

Publisher

Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

Source Publication

Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy

Source ISSN

0190-6011

Original Item ID

doi: 10.2519/jospt.2012.0103

Abstract

The convex-concave rules purportedly help describe the roll-and-slide relationships that naturally occur between moving articular surfaces. There are 2 components of this rule, depending on whether the convex or concave articular member of the joint is considered the moving segment. As a teacher of kinesiology and a physical therapist, I have always respected these rules, primarily because of their ability to assist with the mental imaging of joint motion. Recently, I have been perplexed by questions from experienced physical therapists as to why the convex-concave rules are still being taught in college or continuing education venues, when research has shown that they are flawed. Perhaps I am so hopelessly infatuated with, and blinded by, the educational charm and utility of the convex-concave rules that I fail to realize they are flawed. Are they? I don’t think so, which is the topic of this editorial.

Comments

Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy, Vol. 42, No. 2 (February 2012): 53-55. DOI: 10.2519/jospt.2012.0103.

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