Title

Personality Trait Theory and Multitasking Performance: Implications for Ergonomic Design

Document Type

Article

Language

eng

Format of Original

19 p.

Publication Date

2014

Publisher

Taylor & Francis

Source Publication

Theoretical Issues in Ergonomics Science

Source ISSN

1463-922X

Abstract

Although system designers usually minimise the role of individual differences in operation, personality variables could explain differences in multitasking performance. A concomitant theoretical issue is whether primary or surface personality traits do a better job of predicting performance than the Five-Factor Model (FFM) or global traits. A sample of 174 undergraduates completed the Sixteen Personality Factor Questionnaire (16PF), which was followed by a performance task. A computer-based task that measured simultaneous performance on an arithmetic task and a mental rotation task was used to measure multitasking performance; scores measured the percent accuracy. Primary traits for low emotional sensitivity and high abstractedness, self-control, and general reasoning were all correlated with performance (R 2 = .11), but global or traits corresponding to the FFM were not, except in one sporadic task trial. There was also a strong gender effect on performance. Implications for the study of personality traits in ergonomics are discussed.

Comments

Theoretical Issues in Ergonomics Science, Vol. 15, No. 5 (2014): 432-450. DOI.

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