Document Type

Article

Language

eng

Publication Date

4-2019

Publisher

Wiley

Source Publication

Journal of Community Psychology

Source ISSN

0090-4392

Abstract

Community psychologists have noted the limitations of professional models of mental health treatment, demonstrating that people are more likely to use informal familial or community support during adversity. However, relatively little is known about the forms and functions of informal help seeking and provision. Semistructured interviews (N = 170), in which a sample of predominantly rural‐dwelling adolescents and adults described significant life experiences, were coded for instances of receiving help. Codes thematically categorized the type of adversity, role of the helper, and nature of the help received. Most participants (67.64%) reported the presence of at least one informal helper; only 8.82% of participants discussed receiving professional help. Chi‐square analyses suggested that the nature of the help received varied by the types of helper and adversity being experienced and that different helpers were more likely to aid with particular adversities. The presence of a nonfamilial, nonprofessional helper was associated with higher posttraumatic growth, generativity, and perceived social support.

Comments

Accepted version. Journal of Community Psychology, Vol. 47, No. 3 (April 2019): 477-494. DOI. © 2019 Wiley. Used with permission.

Available for download on Thursday, April 01, 2021

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