Date of Award

Spring 1990

Degree Type

Thesis - Restricted

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Nursing

First Advisor

Shaw, Christine R.

Second Advisor

Steele, Beverly

Third Advisor

Waite, Linda

Abstract

A quasi-experimental design was completed to identify how the predictor variables of family and nurse interactions related to the critierion variable of patient anxiety. The research questions examined in the study were : 1) Do changes occur in the cardiac surgery patient's heart rate (ER), blood pressure (BP), number of premature ventricular contractions per minute (PVCs/min), and self-identified state anxiety level during family interactions? 2) Do changes occur in the cardiac surgery patient's HR, BP, PVCs/min, and self-identified anxiety level during nurse interactions? and 3) Are there differences in the cardiac surgery patient's HR, BP, PVCs/min, and self-identified anxiety level when interacting with family members as compared to nursing staff? A purposive sample of 30 cardiac surgery patients had their HR, BP, and PVCs/min monitored during baseline, family interaction, and nurse interaction time periods. They also answered questions on the Spielberger State Anxiety Inventory (STAI Y-1) after those same time periods. Data were analyzed using Multivariate Analysis of Variance (MANOVA) techniques comparing baseline to family and nurse interaction, and family to nurse interaction. The only significant difference was an increase in the variable of high systolic BP when comparing family interaction to baseline (p=.05). The mean increase in systolic BP during family interaction was, however, less than 10mmHg, which is not clinically significant. No other variables were statistically or clinically significant when comparing the cardiac surgery patient's baseline data to family interaction and nurse interaction, or comparing family and nurse interaction data.

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