AN ANALYSIS OF THE EFFECTS OF ATTRIBUTIONAL STYLE, SELF-ESTEEM, SOCIAL NETWORKS, AND SELECTED HEALTH PRACTICES ON HEALTH STATUS: CURRICULUM IMPLICATIONS (COMMUNITY HEALTH, LIFESTYLE CHANGES)

ROSALIE A STEINER, Marquette University

Abstract

A descriptive correlational study investigated the effects of attributional style, self-esteem, social networks, and selected health practices on health status. Findings were considered to have implications for curriculum development at the K-12 level, for nursing education, and for the individual's personal curriculum. A questionnaire was completed by 86 community residents, 40 to 65 years of age. The participants were clients of a community health agency health promotion program. Data analysis was descriptive and correlational. Multiple regressions and path analyses yielded the following results: (1) Health status was significantly and directly related to the combined effects of attributional style, self-esteem, social networks, and health practices. (2) Attributional style significantly and directly affected health status and did not indirectly affect it through its effect on health practices. (3) Self-esteem significantly and directly affected health status and did not affect it indirectly through its effect on health practices. (4) Social networks significantly and directly affected health status and indirectly affected it through its effect on health practices. Although attributional style and self-esteem did not indirectly affect health status through their effects on health practices, further research may determine important links among the variables. Recommendations were made for future investigations in various populations, using larger samples.

Recommended Citation

STEINER, ROSALIE A, "AN ANALYSIS OF THE EFFECTS OF ATTRIBUTIONAL STYLE, SELF-ESTEEM, SOCIAL NETWORKS, AND SELECTED HEALTH PRACTICES ON HEALTH STATUS: CURRICULUM IMPLICATIONS (COMMUNITY HEALTH, LIFESTYLE CHANGES)" (1986). Dissertations (1962 - 2010) Access via Proquest Digital Dissertations. AAI8618721.
http://epublications.marquette.edu/dissertations/AAI8618721

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