Document Type

Article

Language

eng

Format of Original

30 p.

Publication Date

7-2006

Publisher

SAGE Publications

Source Publication

The Counseling Psychologist

Source ISSN

0011-0000

Abstract

Nineteen counseling psychology faculty members were interviewed regarding their advising relationships with doctoral students. Advisors informally learned to advise from their experiences with their advisor and their advisees and defined their role as supporting and advocating for advisees as they navigated their doctoral program. Advisors identified personal satisfaction as a benefit and time demands as a cost of advising. Good advising relationships were facilitated by advisees’ positive personal or professional characteristics, mutual respect, open communication, similarity in career path between advisor and advisee, and lack of conflict. Difficult relationships were affected by advisees’ negative personal or professional characteristics, lack of respect, research struggles, communication problems, advisors feeling ineffective working with advisees, disruption or rupture of the relationship, and conflict avoidance. Implications for research and training are discussed.

Comments

Accepted version. The Counseling Psychologist, Vol. 34, No. 4 (July 2006): 489-518. DOI. © SAGE Publications 2006. Used with permission.

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