Document Type

Article

Language

eng

Format of Original

10 p.

Publication Date

1996

Publisher

American Real Estate Society

Source Publication

Journal of Real Estate Research

Source ISSN

0896-5803

Abstract

The goal of this paper is to empirically measure the consumer utility trade-off between store location (i.e., distance to a shopping center) and retail agglomeration in regional shopping centers. Using the Lakshmanan and Hansen retail expenditure model, our findings reveal that the distance specification is of surprisingly little importance in explaining retail sales. Conversely, agglomeration economies were of significant importance in explaining consumer patronage at regional shopping centers. The implication of these results is that smaller regional shopping centers may be dominated by large super-regional shopping centers with the smaller one or two anchor regional shopping centers unable to compete with the larger, many-anchored super-regional shopping centers.

Comments

Published version. Journal of Real Estate Research, Vol. 12, No. 3 (1996): 459-468. Publisher Link. © American Real Estate Society 1996. Used with permission.

Mark Eppli was affiliated with George Washington University at the time of publication.

Share

COinS