Document Type

Article

Publication Date

4-2010

Source Publication

Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology

Abstract

Past research has noted that aspects of living in the United States place Latinos at risk for experiencing psychological problems. However, the specific features of the adaptation process that contribute to depression remain unclear. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the ability of acculturation, acculturative stress, and coping to predict membership into low, medium, and high groups of depression among Latinos. Within a group of 148 Latino adults from the community, a multinomial logistic regression revealed that an Anglo orientation, English competency pressures, and active coping differentiated high from low depression and that a Latino orientation and, to some extent, the pressure to acculturate distinguished medium from low depression. These results highlight a pattern of characteristics that function as risk and protective factors in relation to level of symptom severity. The findings are discussed in terms of implications for Latino mental health, including considerations for intervention and prevention.

Comments

Post-print.

Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, Volume 16, No. 2 (April 2010), DOI: 10.1037/a0017357.

This article may not exactly replicate the final version published in the APA journal. It is not the copy of record.