Title

Orthognathic Surgical Outcomes in Patients With and Without Craniofacial Anomalies

Document Type

Article

Language

Eng

Publication Date

2-2018

Publisher

Elsevier (WB Saunders)

Source Publication

Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

Source ISSN

0278-2391

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this study is to examine hospitalization outcomes after orthognathic surgery. This study tests the hypothesis that patients with craniofacial anomalies have higher billed hospital charges, longer lengths of stay, and increased odds of development of infectious complications when compared with patients without craniofacial anomalies.

Materials and Methods

The Nationwide Inpatient Sample for the years 2012 and 2013 was used. All patients who underwent an orthognathic surgical procedure were selected. The primary independent variable of interest was presence of a congenital cleft and/or craniofacial anomaly. The outcome variables were the occurrence of complications, billed hospital charges, and length of stay. Multivariable logistic and linear regression models were used to examine the effect of the presence of craniofacial anomalies on outcomes.

Results

During the study period, a total of 16,515 patients underwent an orthognathic surgical procedure in the United States. Of these patients, 2,760 had a cleft and/or craniofacial anomaly. An infectious complication occurred in 7.4% of those with a craniofacial anomaly (compared with 0.6% of those without a craniofacial anomaly). The mean billed hospital charges in those with a craniofacial anomaly was $139,317 (compared with $56,189 in those without a craniofacial anomaly). The mean length of stay in the hospital in patients with a craniofacial anomaly was 8.8 days (compared with 1.8 days in those without a craniofacial anomaly). These differences in outcomes between patients with and patients without craniofacial anomalies were significant after we adjusted for patient- and hospital-level confounders.

Conclusions

Patients with a craniofacial anomaly are at higher risk of development of infectious complications, have higher hospital charges, and stay in the hospital for a longer duration after orthognathic surgery when compared with those without a craniofacial anomaly.

Comments

Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Vol. 76, No. 2 (February 2018). DOI.

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