The career of Andrew Schulze, 1924--1968: Lutherans and race in the Civil Rights Era

Kathryn M Galchutt, Marquette University

Abstract

This dissertation tells the story of Andrew Schulze (1896-1982), a Lutheran pastor and civil rights pioneer, who dedicated his career to improved race relations in both church and society. A white Lutheran pastor, Schulze began his ministry serving black Lutheran congregations. Later in his career, he was behind the development of the Lutheran Human Relations Association of America, an organization dedicated to promoting racial understanding. Schulze's life and work was based in the Midwest, the region of the country with the highest concentration of Lutherans. Schulze's career is used as a prism to examine the nature of Lutheran race relations in twentieth-century American society. Like other predominately white denominations, Lutherans were slow to realize the theological and social significance of racial equality. Andrew Schulze was one of the leaders who challenged and prodded Lutherans in the struggle for racial justice during the years of the Civil Rights Movement.

Recommended Citation

Galchutt, Kathryn M, "The career of Andrew Schulze, 1924--1968: Lutherans and race in the Civil Rights Era" (2002). Dissertations (1962 - 2010) Access via Proquest Digital Dissertations. AAI3059372.
https://epublications.marquette.edu/dissertations/AAI3059372

Share

COinS