Occupational self-evaluations by rehabilitation employees and job burnout

Jean Marie Kimmel, Marquette University

Abstract

The study sought to compare the relationship between burnout as measured by the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) and the rating of the six variables in the Occupational Self-Evaluation (an instrument developed for this study) by employees who work with individuals with developmental disabilities. Two null hypotheses were examined against their alternatives. The first null hypothesis stated that no statistically significant relationships exist among the three subscale scores of the Maslach Burnout Inventory, namely, (a) Emotional Exhaustion, (b) Depersonalization, and (c) Personal Accomplishment and any of the six variables identified on the Occupational Self-Evaluation: (a) Perceived amount of control in decision making, (b) Approximate absenteeism rate, (c) Amount of emotional and social support, (d) Satisfaction with the training and support systems to deal with the clients, (e) Level of anticipation for career advancement, (f) Feelings toward amount of pay received. The first hypothesis was rejected in eight of the eighteen comparisons. When the six variables in the Occupational Self-Evaluation were correlated with the Emotional Exhaustion Subscale, five of the six correlation coefficients were significant: (a) Absenteeism rate, (b) Amount of Emotional and Social Support, (c) Satisfaction with the training and support systems to deal with the clients, (d) Level of anticipation for career advancement, and (e) Feelings toward amount of pay received. When the six variables in the Occupational Self-Evaluation were correlated with the Depersonalizational Subscale only Absenteeism rate had significant results. When the six variables in the Occupational Self Evaluation were correlated with the Personal Accomplishment Subscale, Absenteeism rate and Amount of Social and Emotional Support were significant. The second null hypothesis stated that no statistically significant canonical correlation coefficient would be found between the primary canonical factor derived from the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) and the primary canonical factor derived from the six variables in the Occupational Self-Evaluation. The null hypothesis was rejected in the overall comparison. The primary canonical factor derived from the Maslach Burnout Inventory Subscales and the primary canonical factor derived from the six variables in the Occupational Self-Evaluation had a canonical correlation of.536 which was significant at the.001 level.

Recommended Citation

Kimmel, Jean Marie, "Occupational self-evaluations by rehabilitation employees and job burnout" (1993). Dissertations (1962 - 2010) Access via Proquest Digital Dissertations. AAI9325682.
https://epublications.marquette.edu/dissertations/AAI9325682

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