Document Type

Article

Language

eng

Publication Date

7-2016

Publisher

Elsevier

Source Publication

Regional Science and Urban Economics

Source ISSN

0166-0462

Abstract

We simulate changes to metropolitan area home prices from reforming the Mortgage Interest Deduction (MID). Price simulations are based on an extended user cost model that incorporates two dimensions of behavioral change in home buyers: sensitivity of borrowing and the propensity to use tax deductions. We simulate prices with both inelastic and elastic supply. Our results show a wide range of price effects across metropolitan areas and prospective policies. Considering behavioral change and no supply elasticity, eliminating the MID results in average home price declines as steep as 13.5% in Washington, D.C., and as small as 3.5% in Miami-Fort Lauderdale, FL. Converting the MID to a 15% refundable credit reduces prices by as much as 1.4% in San Jose, CA, San Francisco, CA, and Washington, D.C. and increases average price in other metropolitan areas by as much as 12.1% (Miami-Fort Lauderdale). Accounting for market elasticities produces price estimates that are on average 36% as large as standard estimates.

Comments

Accepted version. Regional Science and Urban Economics, Vol. 49 (July 2016): 12-23. DOI. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. Used with permission.

Available for download on Monday, July 01, 2019

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