Title

Prevention of Cold-Induced Increase in Blood Pressure of Rats by Captopril

Document Type

Article

Language

eng

Publication Date

6-1-1991

Publisher

American Heart Association

Source Publication

Hypertension

Source ISSN

0194-911x

Abstract

To assess the possibility that the renin-angiotensin system may play a role in the development of cold-induced hypertension, three groups of rats were used. Two groups were exposed to cold (5 +/- 2 degrees C) while the remaining group was kept at 26 +/- 2 degrees C. One group of cold-treated rats received food into which captopril (0.06% by weight) had been thoroughly mixed. The remaining two groups received the same food but without captopril. Systolic blood pressure of the untreated, cold-exposed group increased significantly above that of the warm-adapted, control group within 4 weeks of exposure to cold. In contrast, chronic treatment with captopril prevented the elevation of blood pressure. Rats were killed after 4 months of exposure to cold. At death, the heart, kidneys, adrenal glands, and interscapular brown fat pad were removed and weighed. Although captopril prevented the elevation of blood pressure in cold-treated rats, it did not prevent hypertrophy of the kidneys, heart, and interstitial brown adipose tissue that characteristically accompanies exposure to cold. Thus, chronic treatment with captopril prevented the elevation of blood pressure when administered at the time exposure to cold was initiated. It also reduced the elevated blood pressure of cold-treated rats when administered after blood pressure became elevated. This suggests that the renin-angiotensin system may play a role in the elevation of blood pressure during exposure to cold.

Comments

Hypertension, Vol. 17, No. 6, pt. 1 (June 1, 1991): 763-770. DOI.

Paula E. Papanek was affiliated with the University of Florida - Gainesville at the time of publication.

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