Title

Cigarette Smoking, Physical activity, and Alcohol Consumption: Relationship to Blood Lipids and Lipoproteins in Premenopausal Females

Document Type

Article

Language

eng

Publication Date

7-1984

Publisher

Elsevier (WB Saunders)

Source Publication

Metabolism

Source ISSN

0026-0495

Abstract

A total of 164 premenopausal female subjects were randomly selected for evaluation from a much larger pool of volunteers. The relationships between blood lipid and lipoprotein levels as dependent variables and cigarette smoking, physical activity, and alcohol consumption were determined from partial regression coefficients. A lower HDL-C level (10.1 mg/dL) was seen in smokers v nonsmokers. For each ounce of alcohol consumed, HDL-C level was higher by 2.8 mg/dL, and greater physical activity was associated with a higher HDL-C level of 8.6 mg/dL. An analysis of covariance with covariance adjustments for age and body fat revealed that smokers who regularly exercise or consume alcohol had significantly lower HDL-C levels than nonsmokers with similar habits. Subjects who both exercise and consume alcohol demonstrated higher HDL-C levels than those who indulge in one or the other separately. Results suggest that cigarette smoking may attenuate the effects of chronic exercise or alcohol consumption, or of both, to raise HDL-C levels. Also, chronic exercise and alcohol consumption may exert an additive effect, raising HDL-C level.

Comments

Metabolism, Vol. 33, No. 7 (July 1984): 585-590. DOI.

Paula Papanek was affiliated with the University of Louisville at the time of publication.

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