Document Type

Article

Language

eng

Publication Date

12-2019

Publisher

Elsevier

Source Publication

Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic and Neonatal Nursing

Source ISSN

1552-6909

Abstract

Objective

To estimate the effects of women’s weight changes in four sequential perinatal periods across first and second pregnancies (pregravid, first gestation, interpregnancy, second gestation) on adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes in the second pregnancy while accounting for interdependencies in weight across the four periods (Aim 1) and to test the influence of the sequential path of weight changes through the four perinatal periods of risk on maternal and neonatal outcomes in the second pregnancy (Aim 2).

Design

Secondary data analysis.

Setting

Thirty-one Wisconsin hospitals.

Sample

Women with 24,795 linked records from first and second births from 2006 through 2013.

Methods

We used a fully recursive system of linear and logistic regression equations to examine the relationships among weight changes in the four perinatal periods with maternal (gestational diabetes mellitus, gestational hypertension, cesarean birth) and neonatal (macrosomia, small for gestational age, large for gestational age, low birth weight, congenital anomalies, and perinatal death) adverse outcomes in the second pregnancy.

Results

Pregravid weight was weakly and inconsistently associated with weight changes in subsequent periods. Each 5-kg incremental weight change in the first pregnancy, interpregnancy, and second pregnancy contributed to a 0.75- to 5-kg weight change in subsequent periods, 9% to 25% change in risk for adverse maternal outcomes, and 8% to 47% change in risk for adverse neonatal outcomes in the second pregnancy. Fluctuations in weight across pregnancies and associations with outcomes were strongest among normal-weight and overweight women.

Conclusion

Weight changes across two pregnancies affected maternal and neonatal outcomes in the second pregnancy in all body mass index categories; the larger weight fluctuations observed in normal and overweight women were associated with greater risk of adverse outcomes. Attention to pregnancy weight during and between pregnancies is important for targeted weight counseling to reduce risks in subsequent pregnancies.

Comments

Accepted version. Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic and Neonatal Nursing, Vol. 48, No. 6 (November 2019): 615-626. DOI. © 2019 Elsevier. Used with permission.

Available for download on Monday, November 01, 2021

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