Document Type

Article

Language

eng

Format of Original

8 p.; 23 cm

Publication Date

12-2015

Publisher

Elsevier

Source Publication

Journal of Anxiety Disorders

Source ISSN

0887-6185

Original Item ID

doi: 10.1016/j.janxdis.2015.09.008; PubMed Central, PMCID: PMC4658278; Shelves: RC 531 .J68 2015 v. 36, Memorial Periodicals

Abstract

The Massachusetts General Hospital Hairpulling Scale (MGH-HPS) and the NIMH Trichotillomania Severity Scale (NIMH-TSS) are two widely used measures of trichotillomania severity. Despite their popular use, currently no empirically-supported guidelines exist to determine the degrees of change on these scales that best indicate treatment response. Determination of such criteria could aid in clinical decision-making by defining clinically significant treatment response/recovery and producing accurate power analyses for use in clinical trials research. Adults with trichotillomania (N = 69) participated in a randomized controlled trial of psychotherapy and were assessed before and after treatment. Response status was measured via the Clinical Global Impressions-Improvement Scale, and remission status was measured via the Clinical Global Impressions-Severity Scale. For treatment response, a 45% reduction or 7-point raw score change on the MGH-HPS was the best indicator of clinically significant treatment response, and on the NIMH-TSS, a 30–40% reduction or 6-point raw score difference was most effective cutoff. For disorder remission, a 55–60% reduction or 7-point raw score change on the MGH-HPS was the best predictor, and on the NIMH-TSS, a 65% reduction or 6-point raw score change was the best indicator of disorder remission. Implications of these findings are discussed.

Comments

Accepted version. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, Vol. 36 (December 2015): 44-51. DOI. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Used with permission.

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Psychology Commons

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