Title

Interparental conflict in context: exploring relations between parenting processes and children's conflict appraisals.

Document Type

Article

Language

eng

Format of Original

9 p.

Publication Date

2010

Publisher

Taylor & Francis

Source Publication

Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology

Source ISSN

1537-4416

Abstract

Children's appraisals of conflict are a mechanism by which parental discord can lead to child maladjustment. The cognitive-contextual framework proposes that parent-child relationships may affect how children perceive conflict, but this idea has rarely been examined empirically. This study investigated relations between conflict appraisals, parenting, and child adjustment in a sample of 150 8- to 12-year-old children, using a multi-informant, multimethod design. Mothers' coercive/controlling and emotionally unsupportive parenting magnified the relation between conflict and children's self-blame; emotionally supportive parenting diminished this association. Children's secure attachment with fathers was linked with less threat and self-blame; more security reduced self-blame for conflict. Data suggest that supportive, responsive parenting can buffer the effects of interparental conflict on children by reducing self-blaming attributions for parental discord.

Comments

Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, Volume 39, Issue 2, pp 163-175 (2010). Permalink: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20390808

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