Conferences, Symposia, and Events

Conversations across the Humanities

An interdisciplinary conference called “Conversations Across the Humanities” was held from 8:30 to 4:30 on Friday, April 19, 2013. Sponsored by the Way Klingler College of Arts and Sciences, it featured nearly thirty presentations from faculty members and graduate students in English, Foreign Languages and Literatures, History, Philosophy, Psychology, and Theology, as well as from the College of Communications and Raynor Memorial Library. Session topics included Popular Representations of Religious Figures, Reading Race Across the Disciplines, Space across Disciplines, Revisiting American Borderlands , and Digital Humanities.

The conference was organized by Eugenia Afinoguénova (Foreign Languages and Literatures), Kristen Foster (History), Diane Hoeveler (English), and Debra Oswald (Psychology), who received Fellowships in the College’s “Engaging Differences and Commonalities Through the Humanities.” Each received a two-course buyout and a small fund to pursue their own research projects and to participate in workshops on their papers and chapters with other interested members of the MU community.

The conference was free and open to the public; all sessions were in Cudahy Hall.

Click here to download the event program in its entirety.

Counselor Education and Counseling Psychology Research Exchange Conference

Come. Discuss. Share. Impart. Teach. Learn.

The Annual Counselor Education and Counseling Psychology Research Exchange Conference allowed students and faculty from the College of Education, as well as students and faculty of the Psychology Department, the opportunity to present research and papers in a collegial and comfortable setting.

The Research Exchange Conference was an opportunity for students to gain experience in submitting proposals to a conference, undergoing a peer-review process, and improving their presentation skills. The event was intended to be an informal conference that promotes the sharing of knowledge and experience.

Presentations were judged by peers and awards were given out to those with exceptional papers and posters.

Digital Scholarship Symposia (Library (Raynor Memorial Libraries))

The Second Annual Digital Scholarship Symposium, sponsored by Raynor Memorial Libraries, the Department of History, the Digital Scholarship Work Group, and the University Library Board, was held in Raynor Library’s Beaumier Suites from 8:30 a.m. – 2:30p.m. on Thursday, September 29, 2016. Keynote speakers, Bethany Nowviskie and Sharon Leon, addressed critical issues in the growth of digital scholarship. The program was rounded out with a panel discussion on digital scholarship tools and technologies, followed by broad based discussion on issues, perspectives, and future developments for digital scholarship at Marquette.

Freedom Project Video Competition

The word "freedom" has been essential to how Americans understand themselves and their country since its founding, but the term has born many meanings and many contexts.

Whether it is idealized, politicized, or questioned, "freedom" resonates strongly in American culture, despite the wide variety of understandings it evokes.

As part of Marquette's year-long Freedom Project, a commemoration of the Sesquicentennial of the Civil War that explores the many meanings and histories of emancipation and freedom in the United States and beyond, the Raynor Memorial Libraries hosted a competition inviting students, in 30 seconds or less, to reflect on the question, "What does 'freedom' mean to me?"

These video reflections were recorded in 2013 on March 21st in the Raynor Memorial Libraries and March 25th in the Alumni Memorial Union.

Interdisciplinary Moral Forum (Moral Self Archive)

The Interdisciplinary Moral Forum (IMF) brought together 60 moral self researchers from around the world and from multiple disciplines. It was held at Marquette University in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Participants included two members from each semi-finalist research team, members of the Core Project Team, and other interested members of the Marquette and Milwaukee academic communities.

The IMF had two chief purposes. First, it provided an opportunity for the Core Project Team to evaluate the semi-finalist research proposals. Second, it launched the Moral Self Network, an interdisciplinary and international network of scholars focused on the topics of the self, motivation and virtue. This network functions as a support to our funded research teams and a resource for other moral self researchers.

Scholarly Communication Symposium (Library (Raynor Memorial Libraries))

February 2013 -- Raynor Memorial Libraries hosted a Scholarly Communication Symposium on Monday, February 11. The event took place in Raynor Library's Beaumier Suites from 9 a.m. through 3 p.m.

Speakers addressed key communication and publishing issues being faced by researchers and the academic community. Topics included open access publishing, research data management, institutional repositories, emerging technologies, and copyright.