Title

Metabolic Comparison of One-Anastomosis Gastric Bypass, Single-Anastomosis Duodenal-Switch, Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass, and Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy in Rat

Document Type

Article

Language

eng

Publication Date

8-29-2018

Publisher

Elsevier

Source Publication

Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases

Source ISSN

1550-7289

Abstract

Background

One-anastomosis gastric bypass (OAGB) and single-anastomosis duodenal switch (SADS) have become increasingly popular weight loss strategies. However, data directly comparing the effectiveness of these procedures with Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and vertical sleeve gastrectomy (SG) are limited.

Objectives

To examine the metabolic outcomes of OAGB, SADS, RYGB, and SG in a controlled rodent model.

Setting

Academic research laboratory, United States.

Methods

Surgeries were performed in diet-induced obese Long-Evans rats, and metabolic outcomes were monitored before and for 15 weeks after surgery.

Results

All bariatric procedures induced weight loss compared with sham that lasted throughout the course of the study. The highest percent fat loss occurred after OAGB and RYGB. All bariatric procedures had improved glucose dynamics associated with an increase in insulin (notably OAGB and SADS) and/or glucagon-like protein-1 secretion. Circulating cholesterol was reduced in OAGB, SG, and RYGB. OAGB and SG additionally decreased circulating triglycerides. Liver triglycerides were most profoundly reduced after OAGB and RYGB. Circulating iron levels were decreased in all surgical groups, associated with a decreased hematocrit value and increased reticulocyte count. The fecal microbiome communities of OAGB, SADS, and RYGB were significantly altered; however, SG exhibited no change in microbiome diversity or composition.

Conclusions

These data support the use of the rat for modeling bariatric surgical procedures and highlight the ability of the OAGB to meet or exceed the metabolic improvements of RYGB. These data point to the likelihood that each surgery accomplishes metabolic improvements through both overlapping and distinct mechanisms and warrants further research.

Comments

Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases, (Online prior to print). DOI.

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