Document Type

Article

Language

eng

Publication Date

Fall 2009

Publisher

Center for Catholic and Evangelical Theology

Source Publication

Pro-Ecclesia

Source ISSN

1063-8512

Abstract

The contribution of monasticism to Christian theology's framework in almost all periods is undisputed. However, the eighteenth century as a period of monastic theology is still—unjustly—overlooked. That was precisely the time when monks, mostly Benedictines, challenged the traditional ways of theologizing and, along with a number of dedicated individuals, initiated what came to be called the Catholic Enlightenment.1 This movement worked not only for a renewal of ecclesiastical practice and thought, but also for a peaceful dialogue between the Christian churches and even toward an ecumenical theology. One of the most intriguing figures of this enlightened theology is the Swabian Benedictine Beda Mayr (1742-1794)—the forgotten "grandfather" of ecumenical theology.

Comments

Published version. Pro Ecclesia, Vol. 18, No. 4 (Fall 2009): 415-436. Publisher link. © 2009 Center for Catholic and Evangelical Theology . Used with permission.

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